Saturday, May 13, 2017

Exploring the New Hampshire Colony by Elizabeth Raum: Book Review


Exploring the New Hampshire Colony
Author: Elizabeth Raum 

Reviewer: Sharon M. Himsl
Publisher:  Capstone Press,  2017
Ages:  8 to 11, Middle Grade
Pages: 48
 
New Hampshire was the third colony founded in North America.
In 1623, a group of businessmen were given a piece of land by the king of England to develop as a colony, stipulating that the rules of government be strictly under the king. In 1679, New Hampshire officially became a royal colony, which by then was known for its source of fish, animal furs, and lumber. 

Raum describes the exploration of the land beginning with (Englishman) Martin Pring in 1603. Pring met the native people in the area, the Abenaki and the Pennacook, who grew corn, beans and squash, and hunted fish and game. For a time the colonists traded peacefully with the Indians, but white diseases began destroying native populations and conflicts soon arose. 

Later, during King Williams War between England and France in 1689, the French enlisted the Indians to fight, who then attacked the colonists. Battles over land between the French and English lasted nearly seventy five years, but peace eventually came in 1763.  

Unfortunately, conflict reared its head again with outrage over the English Stamp Act and high taxes. With its repeal in 1766, the undercurrents of the Revolutionary War had begun. When war broke out in 1775, some 1200 New Hampshire militiamen fought in Boston’s Battle of Bunker Hill, but never on home soil. New Hampshire became the first colony to form its own state government, officially becoming America’s ninth state in 1788.

Raum further describes some of the important cities and pioneers in New Hampshire, which became an important supplier of lumber for the building of ships, boat masts, and furniture. Today New Hampshire is known as the “granite state” for its rocky soil. 

Help aids in Raum's book include mini bios, maps, illustrations, quotes, glossary, timeline and “Did You Know” and “Critical Thinking with Primary Sources” sidebars. A good introduction to New Hampshire's early history. 

6 comments:

  1. This sounds like great reading for that age group. Actually it sounds like something I'd like now.


    Arlee Bird
    Tossing It Out

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  2. Hi Arlee. These may be short and geared for kids, but adults can benefit too. I learn a lot reading these books. Thanks for stopping by!

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  3. Very nice. You know, you make me think I should really make my kids read a book on every state in the United States for one of their school years along the way. Thanks for the idea!

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  4. Thanks. Not a bad idea :) I hope the kids enjoy if you do!

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  5. I never really enjoyed history until I decided to write a book set in 1859. Now I love it.

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  6. I've read boring history before, so I know what you mean. I try to find the story behind the facts. Then it becomes interesting!

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