Friday, April 11, 2014

J is for Japanese Persimmon: Yummy Fruits A-Z

Japanese Persimmon is native to Japan, China, Burma, and India, and one of the oldest fruits cultivated. Records dating back to the 14th century claim that Marco Polo and his expedition ate this fruit. It has been called the "fruit of the gods." 

Persimmon varieties (cultivars) are grown all over the world, including the United States in the south, southwest, and southeast. However, Japanese Persimmon is more prominent than the American persimmon. The trees are smaller, but the fruit is larger and tastes better. Shelf-life of Japanese persimmon is also longer. 

Japanese persimmon is high in dietary fiber, vitamin A, and vitamin C. It has a pleasant, sweet taste, and depending on the cultivar, the texture is either soft or crisp. (Some are too astringent; i.e., not sweet enough to eat plain). A common way to eat this fruit is to slice the flesh in half and scoop out with a spoon. Persimmons are good in jams, sauces, breads, and desserts, too, and excellent dried.


Persimmon Recipe (Video link)

"Dried Japanese Fuyu Persimmons - How to Make Dried Persimmon" 




Persimmon Books



--Persimmon (Sword of the World vol 1) 
by Doc Pruyne (2013)

--The Persimmon Tree by Bryce Courtenay 
(2007) (A collection of romantic stories 
starting with the Japanese invasion of Java;
set in Pacific Islands and Indian Ocean)

--Passion for Persimmons (2009)
by Ann Crozier  (recipe book)

--Under the Persimmon Tree (2008)
by Suzanne Fisher Staples 

--The Life and Times of Persimmon Wilson 
by Nancy Peacock (2013)

Persimmon Movies

--Red Persimmons (Japanese documentary) 2001
(the cultivation of red persimmons)

--Green Persimmon (short) 2014
(a woman tries to bond with estranged mother)

 



Sources: 
http://homeguides.sfgate.com/types-japanese-persimmons-59057.html; 
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/japanese_persimmon.html#Description; 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_persimmon

23 comments:

  1. I love Japanese persimmons! It's my favorite fruit in fall.


    http://romisdg.blogspot.jp/

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    1. Thanks, Romi. You would know best, living in Japan!

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  2. I have never had these fruits, mainly because I didn't know what to do with them. Now I must try them.

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    1. Here you are, another "almost" ice cream tree name from yesterday. You must try persimmons; unless they are ripe, your mouth will pucker a bit (so, make sure a handsome man is around then)...Truly, a delicious fruit.

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    2. I've never eaten this fruit before, but apparently it is available in the U.S.

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  3. Sharon, just looking over all your luscious offerings, I had to make myself a fruit shake this morning. My waistline will thank you - and so I immediately thought I could skip the gym!

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    1. Ha-ha. The waistline dose better on fruit. I try to avoid cookies and such.

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  4. mmmmmm-I love most fruit and have to try this

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    1. If you find a recipe you like, please share. This fruit is a mystery to me.

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  5. I think I had a persimmon once; I know my mom was really good about us trying all fruits available out there. I think I liked it too. I'll have to try one again.

    Just noticed your blog button from Psalm 119:105; don't you just love that psalm?

    betty

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    1. Never tried this fruit myself. I don't recall it being in the stores, but I'm going to keep a look out. I'm glad you noticed the bible verse. I love it too! It's a faith reminder to me to let Jesus be my guide in all I do. If you click on the link you can hear Amy Grant sing this verse (accompanied by Michael J.Smith, another awesome Christian performer) .

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  6. Okay, one I've heard of but never had. (I don't really eat much fruit, have you noticed?)

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    1. Ha-ha. I noticed....but it's never too late :)

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  7. I'm pretty sure I've never had one. I think I'd remember ... but maybe not!

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    1. Hi Trisha! Thanks for stopping by my blog.

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  8. I live in Minnesota, and I've never seen it even in health food stores around here, not that I frequent them often. But I'd really like to find some of this fruit of the gods.
    Deb@ http://debioneille.blogspot.com

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  9. I only know of the persimmon because of Courtenay's book, (I'm a fan. Reading his final novel at the moment.) so I thank you for the additional info. Maybe I'll try one, one day.

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    1. I do not normally read short stories but thought this particular book looked good. Also, I have never read Courtenay's work. Thanks for the tip.

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  10. I don't think I have ever tried a persimmon but I have had a paw paw which grow wild in some of our parks here in Virginia. I have seen it written that the paw paw is the American version of the Persimmon. And I know it's tasty. May have to go gather some up to try your persimmon recipe. Thanks Sharon. Maria from Delight Directed Living

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    1. Hi Maria. Thanks for commenting. Paw paw is a new one to me too :)

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  11. I've never heard of the fruit before and I was surprised to know that it's native to India. Time for me to take a trip to the market and hunt this fruit down. Thanks for recommending this.

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  12. Hi, thanks for visiting Sunday visitor!

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