Monday, April 3, 2017

B for Dorotea Bucca: Female Scientists Before Our Time


During the Middle Ages opportunities for women in the field of science were limited. Born and raised in Italy, Dorotea Bucca, stood a far better chance of studying medicine than other women in Europe. It helped that her father, Giovanni Bucca, a physician and professor of Medicine and Philosophy, had encouraged her interest.

A bust of Dorotea Bucca (1360-1436) 

Dorotea became a physician and took over her father’s position at the University of Bologna when he retired. She worked for forty years. Not much is known about Dorotea’s personal life or whether she faced obstacles or lack of respect along the way working in a male-dominated profession, but one can imagine she did. 

Source:
https://womenimpactscience.wordpress.com/2014/11/16/dorotea-bucca-1360-1436/
https://www.brooklynmuseum.org/eascfa/dinner_party/heritage_floor/dorotea_bucca

23 comments:

  1. Italy was a good pace for professional women in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Having a Dad in the trade must have been helpful too. ;-)

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  2. I also thought that the Middle Ages was a good time for creativity, innovation, breaking the rules - and having a father in the field surely helped! Thanks Sharon -

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    1. @Sue. I thought so too. Having a a leg up from a relative certainly helped. Even today.

      @Susan. They were definitely interesting times. Wouldn't time-travel be great?

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  3. Hi Sharon - that definitely is a way into a profession isn't it ... especially back then. Interesting to read about her ... cheers Hilary

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  4. That is not a name I have ever heard before. Thanks for sharing.

    @msdeniseh553
    Denise at My Life in Retirement Brussels, Belgium

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    1. Hilary.... I'm still surprised we can find information that far back. thanks!

      Denise...all have been new to me! It's been a good review of History, which is so much fun to learn.

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  5. Sounds like she was pretty lucky to be Italian and have a father in the same profession she wished to get into!

    Believe In Fairy Stories: Theme - Folklore & Fairy Tales

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    1. Jodie.... yes definitely agree. Very nice to meet you.

      Natasha.... I looked for more information, just couldn't find. I'd like to think someone knows more somewhere.

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  6. I suspect she was a formidable woman. I hope her personal life was as successful in however she wished it to be, as her professional one, even though we know little about it.
    Tasha
    Tasha's Thinkings - Shapeshifters and Werewolves

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  7. The fact that this did not end in a scandal is probably a good sing. Good for her...

    The Multicolored Diary: WTF - Weird Things in Folktales

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  8. It's hard to imagine she wouldn't have faced some obstacles. Good for her for sticking it out.

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    1. @Natasha. Hi. Just wasn't much on this lady, but she's recorded in history, so that says something about her accomplishment.

      @Tarkabarka. Ha-ha. Yes, so true!

      @Danielle. Yes, hard to imagine. I wonder if she married or had children. She would have had income to provide for their care.

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  9. It's so amazing what some women in history were able to accomplished, considering the odds that few women received higher education as such and working outside the home was limited. Way to go Dorotea! Thanks for stopping in to visit my latest edition of #AprilA2Z Art Sketching Through the Alphabet Letter "B" (boys). Happy a2zing!

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  10. Yours is a theme I shall follow with interest. I had not heard of Dorotea before. I've been back to your 'A' post as well. I already know I am gong to learn a lot as you go along.

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  11. She wanted to heal the sick and people lived. Remarkable.

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  12. I had never heard of Dorotea (but of her father, yes).

    Eva - Mail Adventures

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    1. @Cathy. There were social classes that were uneducated. Not Dorotea's experience at all.

      @Bob. Thanks. Dorotea was new to me too. Hope to see you back.

      @Spacer Guy. I have wondered as a professor too, if she had much time as a doctor. She must have been busy!

      @Eva. Both were new to me!

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  13. You know? A woman with a successful career in the Middle Ages surprises me a lot more than a woman having a successful career in the Ancient times

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  14. It's amazing. Glad that some women were practicing they are interested in different discoveries than men.

    Dancing to the Bat Beat todayA Piece of Uganda

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  15. I have not heard of her but...wow! Why isn't a movie made about her? I bet she ran into prejudice.

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  16. Interesting women you are portraying. I am not familiar with her.

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    1. @Sarah. I think they were more educated than we realize, at least in certain social classes.

      @Leslie. Women definitely had opportunities back then, but it would have been a tougher road getting there.

      @Birgit. Haven't heard of any movies. Hollywood would probably spice up things to make her life more interesting....maybe about some male physician who's jealous of her position, and then falls in love with her, etc.

      @Sage. Definitely an interesting woman. Also unfamiliar. I'm learning a lot!

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  17. Dorotea probably didn't have much of a personal life because all her time and energy must have been channeled into coping with the obstacles that presented themselves in this male-dominated profession. Just a guess, anyway.

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