Monday, December 12, 2016

Words of Old at Christmastime: Cock-Crow at Christmas, William Shakespeare

Excerpt from "Hamlet" by William Shakespeare (1603)

HORATIO:

"And then it started like a guilty thing
Upon a fearful summons. I have heard,
The cock, that is the trumpet to the morn,
Doth with his lofty and shrill-sounding throat
Awake the god of day; and, at his warning,
Whether in sea or fire, in earth or air,
The extravagant and erring spirit hies
To his confine: and of the truth herein
This present object made probation."

 
 
 

MARCELLUS:
 

"It faded on the crowing of the cock.
Some say that ever 'gainst that season comes
Wherein our Saviour's birth is celebrated,
The bird of dawning singeth all night long:
And then, they say, no spirit dares stir abroad;
The nights are wholesome; then no planets strike,
No fairy takes, nor witch hath power to charm,

So hallow'd and so gracious is the time."


4 comments:

  1. Simply wonderful to read Sharon, thanks.
    Yvonne.

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  2. From Shakespeare's Hamlet too. The birth of Christ continues to give the world pause all these years later.

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  3. This is just beautiful...nought said!

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    Replies
    1. Glad I found this little nugget :) I seldom read Shakespeare anymore.

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