Monday, February 15, 2016

The Classics - CLOSING LINES: The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton

Image result for age of innocence book jacket
"He sat for a long time on the bench in the thickening dusk, his eyes never turning from the balcony. At length a light shone through the windows, and a moment later a man-servant came out on the balcony, drew up the awnings, and closed the shutters.
At that, as if it had been the signal he waited for, Newland Archer got up slowly and walked back alone to his hotel."

(First Published 1920)  


I love the classics and plan to alternately share some "CLOSING lines" over the coming months. Comment if you wish, or read for inspiration. Writing styles were different then, or were they really?  

10 comments:

  1. I've never read that one--I didn't even watch the movie all the way through. Sounds like a heartbreaking story, though, from what I've seen of the movie.

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  2. I don't recall reading this. Wharton won a Pulitzer for the novel, but it was controversial...
    You can read more here: http://blog.loa.org/2011/06/controversial-pulitzer-prize-brings.html

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  3. Boy talk about an opening line that leaves you wanting more

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  4. Yes, it is quite good but a sad story I hear.

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  5. I haven't read this one but good lines.
    Yvonne.

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  6. Those are very powerful closing lines Sharon - I can sense Newland Archer standing up, as if on a signal from the curtains closing in on the night light, to walk slowly back to his hotel - a place of transition I would imagine, or being in transit is what I really mean ..

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    1. So beautifully written. But not a happy ending :(

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  7. I haven't read this one, but these lines create a vivid scene. It doesn't really sound like a happy ending type of story.

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    1. A very melancholy ending, so probably not a book I would like but the writing is superb.

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