Monday, June 8, 2015

The Classics - Opening Lines: Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Timeless_Books.jpg/320px-Timeless_Books.jpgIf you really want to hear about it, the first thing you'll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don't feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth. (Published 1951)


I love the classics and plan to share some "opening lines" over the coming months. Comment if you like, or read for inspiration. Writing styles were different then, but were they really?
 

28 comments:

  1. I was not a reader during my school days, which probably was the last time I read a classic, you know the stuff you "had" to read,can't say I enjoyed them. The only I even remember a little was Wuthering Heights

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    1. I found the classics more enjoyable outside of school, when you could read for pleasure without all those assignments etc.

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  2. The opening is pretty good, but I actually didn't like The Catcher in the Rye. To be honest, I hated Holden Caulfield.

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    1. I admit I wasn't a fan either, but everyone sure was talking about it at the time.

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  3. Hmmm-This sounds like he is talking to a psychiatrist. I have never read this although I know about it.

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    1. Yeah, something like that. He was a mental patient if I remember correctly.

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  4. This sounds like a nifty series. I'm in! As to Catcherr in the Rye, I didn't care for it, myself, but then it was inflicted on me when I was ... let me see ...14. They fed us a lot of terrilble things then. But I grew up somewhat, went to college, and read more J. D. Salinger. And they were not my favorites, but they were fine. Someone said, about C. I. T. R. "I thought I was the only messed up kid in the world until I read that. It made me feel better about myself."

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    1. Oh that is so interesting Diana. It certainly gave a different point of view, unlike anything written before. It was so raw with emotion and hard to read, and yet so honest.

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  5. Oddly, I never had to read it in school or college. I read it several years ago just to see what it was. In the end I put the pieces together and really felt for that family and for Holden; essentially crippled and destablized by grief, unable to help each other. That's what I read. I was really surprised.

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    1. Interesting you went back to read later in life and the compassion you felt. I wonder if I would appreciate it more second time through.

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  6. I had to read it twice for school. I actually liked it. You know, it has been called the first YA novel. At one time it was the dirt of thing kids read under the covers with a torch. And then it was on the curriculum and suddenly everyone hated it! :-)

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    1. Oh I had no idea at all it was the first YA. I remember everyone wanted to read it.

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  7. Sorry, that was "sort of thing", not "dirt".

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    1. No problem :) Happens to me all the time.

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  8. I saw a lot of similarities between Jesse Pinkman ("Breaking Bad") and Holden Caulfield.

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    1. Hmm....have yet to see Breaking Bad. Interesting the comparison.

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  9. The conversational type literature is great. (I like Wendy's comment about Jesse Pinkman, ha ha.)

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    1. Conversational lit....great way to describe :)

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  10. Nothing like an opening line with a run-on sentence with an abundance of the conjunction word "and" and I believe that such a notable opening line is also an excellent way of learning how to hold your breath as you wait and wait and wait for the opening sentence to end and just like that, it ends, abruptly;

    Gary :)

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  11. Right. This post made me decide to go and buy it in ebook. So I did. It's not expensive in ebook, either. I'm enjoying it all over again. Thank you, Sharon!

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    1. So glad you are enjoying. I really do wonder if I'd like it better this many years later.

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  12. That was one that wasn't a required read when I was in high school. I'm probably the only writer in the universe that hasn't read it.

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  13. It does seem lots have read this. Lit teachers loved it. Thanks for stopping by :)

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  14. This is an interesting opening. But you know what I wonder? Would a today writer get away with it? ;-)

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    1. Does make you wonder if we could do the same today. Salinger's opening was pretty unique at the time and it was the Beatnik era after all, so go figure. Publishers and professors thought he was brilliant. Thanks Sarah!

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  15. Thanks for stopping by. Hope the weekend's been good to you.

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